Forget This Digestion Diet Myth Right Now!

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Forget This Digestion Diet Myth Right Now!

(AscendHealthy.com) – Water, water everywhere….but should we drink some with our meals? A nutrition debate recently went viral in cyberspace over whether or not we should sip water when we eat.

Some claim that drinking liquids with meals can destroy your digestion. Others say sipping water as we eat is fine. See what we learned about this digestion diet debate below.

Quick Read:
A recent Instagram meme claimed that drinking water during meals harms our digestion. The social media post alleged that sipping liquids as we eat prevents our bodies from absorbing nutrients, causes bloating, and increases fat storage. Those allegations are myths. Water with meals helps the digestive process and may boost weight loss. Read the full article to learn more.


Discover the Digestion Diet Myth to Forget Below.

Myths and Facts About Drinking Water With Meals

The newest diet debate began over an August 2020 Instagram post. The social media meme warned against drinking water with meals.

But none of the claims about the supposed dangers of water with meals is true. After fact-checkers debunked the post, Instagram labeled the meme false.

Here are the myths and truths about that Instagram post:

  • Myth: Drinking water during meals blocks our bodies from absorbing nutrients during digestion.
    Fact: Drinking water during a meal helps rather than harms our digestion, say experts. Water lets our bodies break down food so we can absorb nutrients.
  • Myth: Water with meals causes bloating.
    Fact: Water helps ease constipation by softening our stool. Constipation is a common cause of bloating.
  • Myth: Liquids with meals literally water down our stomach’s enzymes to cause digestion problems.
    Fact: Our digestive system can adapt its acids and enzymes to each meal’s consistency, whether we’re sipping soup or chomping crunchy peanut butter on crisp apple slices.
  • Myth: Water with meals results in fat storage.
    Fact: Water may boost weight loss. Studies show that drinking water may help us to feel full. That satisfied feeling then reduces our appetite.

Drinks With Meals: Fact Vs. Fiction (With 1 Surprise!)

In past years, related myths have also made the rounds. Here are those digestion diet myths with the facts:

  • Myth: Our saliva dries up if we drink alcoholic or acidic beverages with our meals, resulting in digestive problems.
    Fact: In moderation, alcoholic drinks do not change our digestion. Acidic drinks increase our saliva. Neither beverage has a bad effect on our ability to absorb nutrients during digestion.
  • Myth: Sipping liquids with meals speeds up our digestion, causing stomach problems.
    Fact: Drinking water or other liquids as we eat does not change how fast we digest food.

But here’s the surprising truth: There is one exception to the digestion diet myths about water and other liquids with meals.

Those who have digestive problems like gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) may want to reduce their water consumption during meals. By limiting beverages as they eat, these individuals may reduce their risk of indigestion. Check with your doctor about any such concerns.

For most of us, sipping water or other liquids with our meals has many benefits. Our bodies need water to function. Experts generally suggest drinking eight 8-ounce glasses daily.

Those of us with busy lives may find challenges in drinking enough water throughout the day. One possible solution: Turn sipping water with meals and snacks into a habit. If we eat three meals and two snacks per day with water, we can easily consume 5 of that “8×8” guideline.

Water plays a crucial role in our overall well-being. As conservationist Jacques Yves Cousteau noted, “We forget that the water cycle and the life cycle are one.” In this case, we would be better served to forget the digestion diet myths about water with meals. Instead, let’s raise our water glasses in a toast to this liquid elixir. Bottoms up!

~Here’s to Your Healthy Ascension

Copyright 2020, AscendHealthy.com